Monday, June 12, 2006

A leap of Faith

Each time we reach a new plateau of knowledge and understanding, we must get there by leaping into the unknown. This leap can be downright terrifying, but if we shy away from the precipice, the doorway we can not see beyond, the result is often stagnation and at times, even madness, as we deny the very growth we work so hard to achieve. Once committed to the path, we have only the choice to proceed or to dally, with the attendant consequences. We must face this challenge over and over again as we approach each new leap forward in understanding, acceptance, growth.

We approach a doorway into more light, but are afraid to walk through. We stand there, hesitating, afraid to go in, afraid to go back, afraid....Another way to picture it is standing on the precipice, working up the nerve to jump, trusting that all will be well and will be as it is meant to be. I believe that each crisis we reach and pass, makes us stronger, more willing to take that leap of faith.

Courage is not the absence of fear; it is acting in spite of it. Walking the path takes true courage. I have found that the only real enemy is fear itself. If we can act in the face of fear, we can walk our path with confidence.

8 comments:

Darius said...

It must be that the feeling of choice is stronger for some than others. In my own case, there was a major, sudden, spontaneous occurence, at age 23, of, basically, the sort of "one with the universe" or non-dualistic state of mind sought in meditation.

It was so major that even though it was totally inconsistent with the world view I had at the time, I ended up completely revising my world view. Not sure just how much choice I really had. It was pretty hard to deny the experience had occured or the inherent power and momentousness, even though at first I had no idea what to make of it.

Zareba said...

I agree, Darius. We have the semblance of choice when faced with each new threshold. However it has been my experience that if I do not go through that door way, I would be faced with such an internal turmoil that I could well retreat into madness.

I never did fit in, even as a child. There was too much unanswered in my mind, too much of a need to know. When I discovered meditation in my 20s, it was like going home. I finally had some where to belong. ...Z

Alexys Fairfield said...

Not only do we have to leap. Often times we are suspended in mid air, waiting to land. If we don't look down, the journey is sure to be splendid and fulfilling.

Zareba said...

Thanks, Alexys, unfortunately it is human nature to look down and to be afraid of hights, but once the fear is dealt with, the Journey is Glorious. ...Z

defiant goddess said...

I am a spiritual coward. I admit it. The things I've seen in the doorway have scared the heck outta me. I'm not dallying at the door. I don't want to be anywhere near it. I'm somewhere down the hall pretending the door isn't there. If whatever is on the other side wants me, it'll have to come get me.

And though I confess my frailties, at the same time, I think it takes some degree of wisdom just to recognize that the door is there, it's real, and it's nothing to play with.

Darius said...

Zareba: And not many months after having that experience, and finding out about the sort of thing it was, I started meditating...

Zareba said...

AbNorMal, I have a surprise for you. In time, you will go through that door willingly, and the next, and the next and so on. ...Z

Zareba said...

Darius, I suspect that meditation did the same thing for you....as it did for me. Made survival in this world possible. ...Z